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Beyond The Button: Embracing The Gesture-Driven Interface

Case study

If you like us, or perhaps you are a mobile UI or UX designer, you probably remember the launch of Apple’s first iPhone as if it was yesterday. Among other things, it introduced a completely touchscreen-centered interaction to a individual’s most private and personal device. It was a game-changer.

Today, kids grow up with touchscreen experiences like it’s the most natural thing. Parents are amazed by how fast their children understand how a tablet or smartphone works. This shows that touch and gesture interactions have a lot of potential to make mobile experiences easier and more fun to use.

 

Removing UI clutter

For over two years now, We’ve been exploring the ways in which gestures add value to the user experience of a mobile application. The most important criterion for us is that these interactions feel very intuitive. Zoom has used this as a ground rule for launching a new exercise app pilot. A great way to start designing a more gesture-driven interface is to use your main screen only as a viewport to the main content. We wanted the user to not feel obliged to make important navigation always visible on the main screen. Rather, consider giving it a place of its own. Speaking in terms of a virtual 2-D or 3-D environment, you could design the navigation somewhere next to, below, behind, in front of, above or hidden on top of the main view. A dragging or swiping gesture is a great way to lead the user to this UI element.